Press Inquiries

All press inquiries can be directed to sam (at) gamersagainstbigotry . org.  If you’re looking for a collection of press coverage about Gamers Against Bigotry, you can view that here.

Previous press releases are available below for your convenience.

July 2, 2012: Gamers Against Bigotry Launches Campaign to End Bigoted Language in Gaming (.pdf)

AUSTIN – July 2, 2012 – Gamers Against Bigotry (GAB) is a new organization dedicated to ending bigoted language in online (and offline) gaming. GAB launched GamersAgainstBigotry.org on June 27, with a singular pledge to invite petitioners:

As a gamer, I realize I contribute to an incredibly diverse social network of gamers around the world, and that my actions have the ability to impact others. In effort to make a positive impact, and to create a community that is welcoming to all, I pledge to not use bigoted language while gaming, online and otherwise.

Bigoted language includes, but is not limited to, slurs based on race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and disability.”

 Over 400 petitioners from not only the United States, but from countries such as China, Great Britain and Australia, have already signed the pledge.

Chris Mason, a blogger at Attack the Blog, an entertainment and social justice blog, wrote in support of the cause, “We all enjoy a good shout at the television (and maybe even a swear word or three) when we’re playing against other people online, and nobody wants to stop that. By all means, curse, criticise, and otherwise smack-talk your opponents, but bigotry in the community cannot be tolerated.”

The community of gamers and those afflicted by bigotry in gaming are speaking out too.

Eric Teske, a victim of gaming bigotry, said, “I’m not very good at Call of Duty because I’m too nervous to play online, which means I don’t get to practice, which means I’m no good, which means I will get called a fag if I play online. It’s a vicious circle. I’ve probably only played the game 12 times since I bought it. The unfriendly online gaming culture is a big reason why I stick to single player games like Skyrim.”

Teske sends a warning to growing culture of gaming bigotry, “It’s too bad, really. If the insults used online drive people like me away, then fewer people will buy those kinds of games. Think how much better the next release would be if the production company was able to sell another million units. Think how easy it would be to improve your stats by owning players like me who are just learning if you keep me around longer.

The culture is condensing itself, like boiling the water off your soup, until all you’re left with is a salty mush of individuals who are basically forced to one-up one another with their level of inappropriate insults.”

Bigotry in online gaming is nothing new. It is a growing problem that can be harmful to casual gamers who just want to compete in the multiplayer arena. Gamers Against Bigotry stands firm in their vision to see a more appropriate gaming environment for everyone, no matter their race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation and disability.

Sign the pledge today at GamersAgainstBigotry.org.

Gamers Against Bigotry was created with one purpose in mind: to create a more welcoming gaming community for all gamers, regardless of their identity. Gaming is awesome. And online multiplayer gaming is more awesome. But it sucks that gamers have to choose to not play online, or to deal with a relentless barrage of identity-based hate slung their way if they do log in. 

 

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The Pledge:

As a gamer, I realize I contribute to an incredibly diverse social network of gamers around the world, and that my actions have the ability to impact others. In effort to make a positive impact, and to create a community that is welcoming to all, I pledge to not use bigoted language while gaming, online and otherwise.

Bigoted language includes, but is not limited to, slurs based on race? (e.g, "chink," "nigger," "wetback"), ethnicity? (e.g., "kyke," "polock"), gender? (e.g., "cunt," "bitch," "tranny"), religion? (e.g., "dirty jew," "papist"), sexual orientation? (e.g., "gay," "fag[got]," "dyke"), and disability? (e.g., "retard[ed]").

Read more about the pledge, including what is and isn't included, and the overall purpose here.

Read why you shouldn't use the word "rape" casually here.

Sign the Pledge